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Film Reviews

Worst Picture/Best Picture Series: Bolero and Amadeus (1984)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Lida MacGillivery, two brilliant artists who are masters in their work. Wolfie, a composer who makes exquisite music almost without even trying, and Lida, an exquisite woman who has trouble losing her virginity almost without even trying. BOLERO and AMADEUS BOLERO – “This erotic drama is wonderfully filmed, whether the English countryside, Spain or Bo’s cleavage it …

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Worst Picture/Best Picture Series: Inchon and Gandhi (1982)

Two epic films were released in 1982 that focused on key moments in Asia in the twentieth century. Gandhi, a film about the famous Indian who helped his country gain independence from the British Empire, and Inchon, a film focusing on a key battle during the Korean War. Both films were dream projects of the filmmakers involved. INCHON and GANDHI …

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In Search of Lost Time: Looking at the Small Stuff in The Grand Budapest Hotel

Here is a wonderful piece on Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel from one of Awardswatch’s most esteemed members, Alex Bean. It’s featured on his blog, The Addison Recorder, which is a must-see site for film reviews and conversation. In the very best films there are always a handful of quiet things that insist on the large-scale completeness and grandeur …

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Sundance Film Festival 2014 Roundup

Amidst the increasingly stale Oscar race, where the nominations have been announced and all but a couple races have been set, the Sundance Film Festival has often been a welcome look into the potential contenders of the coming Oscar race. Sometimes it’s a strong indicator, as in 2010 when nine films (including two of the Best Picture nominees, Winter’s Bone and The Kids …

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Review: The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty (Stiller, 2013)

Ben Stiller’s new film The Secret Life of Walter Mitty suffers from something I would call “Zach Snyder Syndrome.” It’s where a film is loaded with moments that can be powerful and emotionally moving when edited nicely together with a fitting piece of music, but when taken in for 2 hours within the context of an attempt at story can …

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Review: Her (Jonze, 2013)

In Spike Jonze’s latest film Her, Joaquin Phoenix plays Theodore Twombly, a professional letter-writer for-hire who composes personal correspondence with his creative mind, sensitive nature, and some high-tech voice-recognition software. While he’s good at his job, he’s also going through a divorce. He can clearly express feelings for others, but has begun closing himself off emotionally. That’s his baseline when …

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Review: All Is Lost (Chandor, 2013)

Cinematically speaking, there are few places more moving, more honestly heartbreaking than on the big screen with a lone character struggling to survive. To be lost, stranded in a desolate place is to provide a narrative hook that is immediately intimate and resoundingly relatable. As modern movies like Cast Away, 127 Hours, and Life of Pi attest, there are many …

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