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Thread: Random Reading Thoughts: Y Kant I Read

  1. #821
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sliced Peach View Post
    Thanks for the reply, Cricket! I'll look for what others have written about these two here later and look forward to read it.

    Yes, I know Hassen Khemiri. He's been mentioned a lot here in Sweden and he's been quite productive for his young age. I have only red his debute novel Ett Öga Rött, which he wrote and published before age 25. I was young when I read it so can't really vouch for its strength but I remember I liked it. I believe it was one of the biggest popular hits here that year. A few years ago he REALLY increased his visibility amongst the public when he wrote a lengthy "open letter" to a Swedish politician concerning ethnic relations in this country. It was widely debated and talked about for a looong time that year.

    I havent read his latest book Everything I Don't Remember but it was very well received and won the August-price (one of our biggest literary prices) the year it was published. I want to read it though and should probably put it higher on my list! Hassen Khemiri clearly has a bright future and Im pleased to see him having an international breakthrough of sorts.
    Thanks, Peachy! That's interesting. He's quite an accomplished playwright too, from what I gather, and has had plays produced in the US and UK. And it looks like there's LGBT content in his work, which is good to see. I've read a lot of Norwegian fiction in recent years (Knausgaard, Dag Solstad, Jon Fosse, etc), but I'm not very well-versed in Swedish literature -- basically only Strindberg and some Tomas Tranströmer poetry, tbh -- so it's nice to discover something new.

    Quote Originally Posted by haqyunus View Post
    Try Mathias Énard or Can Xue.
    Yes and yes! Can Xue is great. Vertical Motion and Frontier are really fascinating books. Yan Lianke is another Chinese writer who has been named as a possible Nobel contender. I've never read him before, so I got a copy of The Four Books.

    Right now, I'm reading Jenny Erpenbeck's Go, Went, Gone.

  2. #822
    This is it. haqyunus's Avatar
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    Garrison Keillor is pissed about Ishiguro winning Nobel.


    Or basic by nature.


  3. #823
    My aunt used to live in Paris RayB's Avatar
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  4. #824
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    Quote Originally Posted by fassy View Post
    Yes, twice. It's truly heartbreaking. We see all her vulnerabilities.
    Yes, I read it recently and it's so beautifully unsentimental, yet heartbreaking. I'd recommend it to everyone here, even though it's not an easy reading.

  5. #825
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    Also, Philip Pullman's LA BELLE SAUVAGE is going to be published on 19th..anyone read the northern lights trilogy..I'm so excited to read the new book.

  6. #826
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    The Booker Prize is announced later today! People generally seem to consider George Saunders the favorite, but I was kind of shocked to see that, according to this article in The Guardian, the Ali Smith is by far outselling all the other books on the shortlist. Autumn has sold 50,000 copies in the UK, followed by Paul Auster's 4321, with 15,000. Lincoln in the Bardo has sold 10,000.

    I find it hard to account for those numbers. Granted, the Smith was published almost a year ago, whereas the Saunders came out in February. But still. Ali Smith, her power. Queen of reviews, queen of sales and queen of the Booker, really (this is her fourth nomination). It's quite extraordinary for someone who isn't exactly in the mainstream. I really think she should win.

  7. #827
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Also, Philip Pullman's LA BELLE SAUVAGE is going to be published on 19th..anyone read the northern lights trilogy..I'm so excited to read the new book.
    COLUMBUS

    It's Lady Bird, but better and without the Satellite Award nomination for Best Cinematography

  8. #828
    Love Streams ladylurks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Also, Philip Pullman's LA BELLE SAUVAGE is going to be published on 19th..anyone read the northern lights trilogy..I'm so excited to read the new book.
    Count me in!


    AW Canon Essentials

  9. #829
    Christmas Time, You're So Fine! Bean's Avatar
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    Lincoln in the Bardo wins the Man Booker!


  10. #830
    This is it. haqyunus's Avatar
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    Poor Ali Smith. Perhaps 5th time will be the charm. Though I am already seeing 'another American won a MB this year' complaints lol. Exactly opposite level of gripes from Nobel.


    Or basic by nature.


  11. #831
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    Seriously. I'm not sure what more Ali Smith needs to do to win the Booker Prize, lol. She's catching up to Beryl Bainbridge, who currently holds the record for most shortlist appearances without a win (5).

    It's kind of funny that George Saunders has won two significant UK-based awards (the Booker and the now-defunct Folio Prize), but has yet to win a major prize in the US. I wonder if this helps or hurts his Pulitzer chances. The first few American lit prizes of the season have conspicuously snubbed Lincoln in the Bardo.

  12. #832
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    oh man I started Lincoln in the Bardo months ago and put it down one day out of frustration and never picked it up again. I'll pick it up again tomorrow LOL
    COLUMBUS

    It's Lady Bird, but better and without the Satellite Award nomination for Best Cinematography

  13. #833
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    So, La Belle Sauvage released yesterday and I still haven't been able to read more than one chapter I wanna read slowly, but there's too much work to do and I can't concentrate

  14. #834
    dos mil cuarenta y seis Aldo's Avatar
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    Recently focusing on contemporary Mexican fiction, and trying to read more women authors.

    I finished Valeria Luiselli's THE STORY OF MY TEETH (2015 finalist for NBCCA), I was delighted by its structure, full of freedom. She reminded me a lot of Bolaño. Cannot wait to read more of her. She's quite young (34).

    Next up I have Emiliano Monge and Laia Jufresa.



  15. #835
    Senior Member AllAboutOscar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RayB View Post




    I read somewhere that Brown never reads fiction? That explains a lot.

  16. #836
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    It takes a little while to get into the style of Lincoln in the Bardo. Then it gets pretty easy.

    Did we ever talk about Jennifer Egan's Manhattan Beach? I read it a little while ago, but it came out recently, so I'm not sure if people have caught up with it. (I believe flibber had a copy?) Anyway, it ended up being a pretty big disappointment. It's relatively engaging, and extremely well-researched, but it all devolves into this really hokey melodrama. And the gangster stuff struck me as horribly misjudged. I never believed a minute of it. Egan has flirted with melodrama before, particularly in Look at Me, but she's completely unmoored here in a historical setting; she gets lost in all that period detail. I feel like this is a novel Dennis Lehane could have written. That's not even shade -- Lehane is a good genre writer -- but this, to me, is a huge step down from A Visit from the Goon Squad, which was so fresh and conceptually interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aldo View Post
    Recently focusing on contemporary Mexican fiction, and trying to read more women authors.

    I finished Valeria Luiselli's THE STORY OF MY TEETH (2015 finalist for NBCCA), I was delighted by its structure, full of freedom. She reminded me a lot of Bolaño. Cannot wait to read more of her. She's quite young (34).

    Next up I have Emiliano Monge and Laia Jufresa.
    The Story of My Teeth wasn't really for me, but Luiselli's Tell Me How It Ends, a short collection of essays, is strong. It's gotten great reviews.

    We were discussing Spanish/Latin American literature a bit unthread. I've been trying to make my way through this list. Not sure if you've read News from the Empire, Aldo. I've read the top four, so that one's next in line. But it sounds kind of dry to me, and it's super long. We'll see, lol. I really liked Beauty Salon, though.

  17. #837
    dos mil cuarenta y seis Aldo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cricket View Post
    The Story of My Teeth wasn't really for me, but Luiselli's Tell Me How It Ends, a short collection of essays, is strong. It's gotten great reviews.

    We were discussing Spanish/Latin American literature a bit unthread. I've been trying to make my way through this list. Not sure if you've read News from the Empire, Aldo. I've read the top four, so that one's next in line. But it sounds kind of dry to me, and it's super long. We'll see, lol. I really liked Beauty Salon, though.
    Tell me how it ends is already in my wishlist! Glad to hear you liked it. I also want to read Luiselli's husband's (Alvaro Enrigue) much celebrated novel, Sudden Death.

    I've read Noticias del Imperio! I actually own a copy that the author himself gave to my parents after he randomly rented a house we owned in the super small coastal town where I grew up, lol. I read it in my teenage years and I quite liked it then, but it's kind of a really traditional novel, written in first person, historical subject, strong character... El País repeated that same survey last year. Bolaño DESERVEDLY tops it (I'd go for Detectives though) and del Paso doesn't make it. I'm not that into the Spain-based editorial scene though, I usually go for US and Mexican-published books...

    Also, just came back from Paris and bought two books in French, L'Etranger (never read Camus and apparently it's good to practice the language) and LeClezio's Le Rêve Mexicain, I adore his essays so let's see if I can pull this in French.



  18. #838
    Christmas Time, You're So Fine! Bean's Avatar
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    The ending of A Constellation of Vital Phenomena just turned me into an ugly, snotty mess. Only George Saunders has made me such an emotional wreck in recent years. Highly recommended!

  19. #839
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aldo View Post
    Tell me how it ends is already in my wishlist! Glad to hear you liked it. I also want to read Luiselli's husband's (Alvaro Enrigue) much celebrated novel, Sudden Death.

    I've read Noticias del Imperio! I actually own a copy that the author himself gave to my parents after he randomly rented a house we owned in the super small coastal town where I grew up, lol. I read it in my teenage years and I quite liked it then, but it's kind of a really traditional novel, written in first person, historical subject, strong character... El País repeated that same survey last year. Bolaño DESERVEDLY tops it (I'd go for Detectives though) and del Paso doesn't make it. I'm not that into the Spain-based editorial scene though, I usually go for US and Mexican-published books...

    Also, just came back from Paris and bought two books in French, L'Etranger (never read Camus and apparently it's good to practice the language) and LeClezio's Le Rêve Mexicain, I adore his essays so let's see if I can pull this in French.
    How lovely to have that connection! I hope its a signed copy. I remember seeing that updated El País list. I think the del Paso isn't on it because it's no longer eligible? I checked, and Noticias del Imperio was published in 1987, which goes back further than 25 years. Ditto for Love in the Time of Cholera.

    Re: Mexican literature. I read Yuri Herrera's Signs Preceding the End of the World, which won the Best Translated Book Award last year. I think I was kind of mixed on it, but I don't really remember, tbh. And I picked up a copy of The Iliac Crest by Cristina Rivera Garza, which just came out in English. I've heard great things about it. There's a lot of interesting writing coming from Latin America right now. Let us know if you read anything good; I'm always up for a good recommendation!

  20. #840
    dos mil cuarenta y seis Aldo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cricket View Post
    How lovely to have that connection! I hope its a signed copy. I remember seeing that updated El País list. I think the del Paso isn't on it because it's no longer eligible? I checked, and Noticias del Imperio was published in 1987, which goes back further than 25 years. Ditto for Love in the Time of Cholera.

    Re: Mexican literature. I read Yuri Herrera's Signs Preceding the End of the World, which won the Best Translated Book Award last year. I think I was kind of mixed on it, but I don't really remember, tbh. And I picked up a copy of The Iliac Crest by Cristina Rivera Garza, which just came out in English. I've heard great things about it. There's a lot of interesting writing coming from Latin America right now. Let us know if you read anything good; I'm always up for a good recommendation!
    Not that sure about the rest of the countries but I would say Mexico is living its best moment in terms of Literature since mid-Century. I'll keep you posted, I'm starting Emiliano Monge's Las Tierras Arrasadas (something like Razed Lands) that has not been translated to English yet but I'm sure it will next year. It was compared to the work of Bolaño and McCarthy.

    So glad to meet people like you who are open to read the work of emerging countries



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