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Thread: Random Film Thoughts: Christ Stopped Right before AwardsWatch

  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by CINNAMON View Post
    Anyway, looking forward to it and Legend slaying in it but that is a tricky role.
    Is Rooney in the cast? Didn't know!

    Nicole Kidman also has a tricky role, and especially some big shoes to fill... Those of The Greatest Actress in the English Language and a member of the Holy Trinity of Acting. Good luck, Kidman! And good luck to Legend too, in case she's in the cast, which I'm not sure!

    ETA: I also agree with your other points, the serious ones. It's just that I'm not sure there's THAT much to be added to this story, by a woman or by a man, unless you change a lot.


  2. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    ETA: I also agree with your other points, the serious ones. It's just that I'm not sure there's THAT much to be added to this story, by a woman or by a man, unless you change a lot.
    I think there is something to add in terms of tone, aesthetic, mood but I agree....not much to the STORY. (but let's face it, this story is told and retold throughout the years, decades, centuries) That being said, hope it's not TOO moody, lol. And a good story is a good story.

  3. #163
    Exquisite taste Jali's Avatar
    Join Date: Dec 2007
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    Before I fall took me by surprise. I thought (don't know why) that this was a thriller, and it's just a heartwarming film. It really touched me, and all the female cast is really good, espeically Deutsh, Sage and Kampouris. I would love to see more of all of them in the future.

  4. #164
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    Appointment in Bray (Delvaux, 1971)

    Ok, guys, who do I have to fuck, what do I have to do, so to make AW start watching Delvaux’s films, and start talking about him? This film in particular would be such an AW darling if AW watched it. Dreamy, ambiguous, elusive. People like filmy or Lost in the Warmest Color should worship it.

    I’m usually suspicious when people say things, about films, like “it’s better to not try to understand it, just go with it” or “just let yourself go” or “abandon yourself to it”, not because it’s not a nice thing to do and a nice approach to certain films, but because I feel it’s often abused, and used for films that don’t merit it, as an excuse for films in which the filmmakers presented things in convoluted ways, or didn’t even know very well what they wanted to say, or were vague, or things like that. Of course, there are masters who can make films that are engaging even when you don’t understand what’s going on, or when you don’t have traditional narrative consistence or thematic clarity, but certainly not everybody can do it, yet the internet often acts as if anybody with a vague and messy film was just some genius and you are not getting it because you didn’t abandon yourself to the mess.

    Well, Delvaux is one of those who CAN make it.

    This is a film in which not much happens, and when the ending is approaching, and you know the film is getting to an end, you wonder “Ok, there’s only two minutes left and nothing of what I was possibly expecting has happened, and in fact not much has happened at all, and I’m not even sure I get the point of the little that has happened”, yet you’ve followed it mesmerized, intrigued, seduced, totally immersed in the mystery of its images and sounds (which are incredibly evocative and suggestive).

    After it ended I was left, I must acknowledge, a little more puzzled than surrendered, even though I had been surrendered to its imagery for 99% of its running time, but then it ends and I was left a bit… “That’s it?” However, that abrupt ending, with its lack of anything resembling narrative climax/denouement/solution, almost immediately made me feel (kind of realise) that had been part of the point all along. The movie started reconfiguring in my head and some of its themes started becoming clearer.

    Still, I didn’t have a very precise take on it, but reading Jonathan Rosenbaum’s review ( http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net/197...z-vous-a-bray/ ), who, by the way, considers it the best Belgian film ever, was very illuminating, and helped me form my own take on it.

    Not that it’s possible to determine a clear “meaning” here: this is willingly mysterious and subtly surreal, so part of the point is not totally getting it (and as I say this is no excuse, Delvaux is among the few who can make unresolved mystery and vagueness work without sacrificing depth and intellectual challenges); but still there are themes here, and very well developed, and some of them became clearer to me thanks to Rosenbaum’s review.

    As in the other Delvaux films I’ve seen, we have a passive protagonist, whose passiveness (although it’s more accurately neutrality in the case of Woman in a Twilight Garden) is one of the main subjects of both the action and the thematic exploration. Saying much more about what I think it’s about (among many things) would perhaps spoil a bit both the mystery of it all and a the little plot there is, so suffice to say that this is a beguiling poetic incursion in the blurry borders between being principled, being passive, being afraid, and what it all implies for your life and what you make of it.

    It’s nominally an adaptation of the novel King Copethua by surreal-ish writer Julien Gracq, which is itself based on an obscure British legend of King Copethua (a misogynistic king who didn’t love women, until he saw a beggar and fell in love with her), which inspired this Pre-Raphaelite/symbolist painting:


    So, you can see that it all has roots in the art and literature of the late 19th century and early 20th century, but this is very much a free adaptation of those themes, made more by association of themes than by literal translation of a story into a movie. It truly is a modernist film that would feel perfectly modern among last year’s offerings at the Locarno film festival.

    Anyways, despite all those references, with its WWI setting and powerfully evocative aroma, I was also reminded of the worlds of Sándor Márai (in particular his novel Embers) and Stefan Zweig.

    But enough of references, you don’t need to know all of this to enjoy the film and chew its delicately encrypted musings. All of this is to say that all of you, but especially SOME of you, just need to watch this film.

    Maybe if I post images I’ll lure you more?















    WATCH IT!!!


    And I also wanted to talk about the magnificent A Touch of Zen (King Hu, 1971) but that post is already too long, I have to do some work, and anyways each of these two movies deserves to have the spotlight for their own for a while, so better to leave Appintment in Bray alone by now.


  5. #165
    Senior Member Goodfella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    Appointment in Bray (Delvaux, 1971)

    Ok, guys, who do I have to fuck, what do I have to do, so to make AW start watching Delvaux’s films, and start talking about him? This film in particular would be such an AW darling if AW watched it. Dreamy, ambiguous, elusive. People like filmy or Lost in the Warmest Color should worship it.

    I’m usually suspicious when people say things, about films, like “it’s better to not try to understand it, just go with it” or “just let yourself go” or “abandon yourself to it”, not because it’s not a nice thing to do and a nice approach to certain films, but because I feel it’s often abused, and used for films that don’t merit it, as an excuse for films in which the filmmakers presented things in convoluted ways, or didn’t even know very well what they wanted to say, or were vague, or things like that. Of course, there are masters who can make films that are engaging even when you don’t understand what’s going on, or when you don’t have traditional narrative consistence or thematic clarity, but certainly not everybody can do it, yet the internet often acts as if anybody with a vague and messy film was just some genius and you are not getting it because you didn’t abandon yourself to the mess.

    Well, Delvaux is one of those who CAN make it.

    This is a film in which not much happens, and when the ending is approaching, and you know the film is getting to an end, you wonder “Ok, there’s only two minutes left and nothing of what I was possibly expecting has happened, and in fact not much has happened at all, and I’m not even sure I get the point of the little that has happened”, yet you’ve followed it mesmerized, intrigued, seduced, totally immersed in the mystery of its images and sounds (which are incredibly evocative and suggestive).

    After it ended I was left, I must acknowledge, a little more puzzled than surrendered, even though I had been surrendered to its imagery for 99% of its running time, but then it ends and I was left a bit… “That’s it?” However, that abrupt ending, with its lack of anything resembling narrative climax/denouement/solution, almost immediately made me feel (kind of realise) that had been part of the point all along. The movie started reconfiguring in my head and some of its themes started becoming clearer.

    Still, I didn’t have a very precise take on it, but reading Jonathan Rosenbaum’s review ( http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net/197...z-vous-a-bray/ ), who, by the way, considers it the best Belgian film ever, was very illuminating, and helped me form my own take on it.

    Not that it’s possible to determine a clear “meaning” here: this is willingly mysterious and subtly surreal, so part of the point is not totally getting it (and as I say this is no excuse, Delvaux is among the few who can make unresolved mystery and vagueness work without sacrificing depth and intellectual challenges); but still there are themes here, and very well developed, and some of them became clearer to me thanks to Rosenbaum’s review.

    As in the other Delvaux films I’ve seen, we have a passive protagonist, whose passiveness (although it’s more accurately neutrality in the case of Woman in a Twilight Garden) is one of the main subjects of both the action and the thematic exploration. Saying much more about what I think it’s about (among many things) would perhaps spoil a bit both the mystery of it all and a the little plot there is, so suffice to say that this is a beguiling poetic incursion in the blurry borders between being principled, being passive, being afraid, and what it all implies for your life and what you make of it.

    It’s nominally an adaptation of the novel King Copethua by surreal-ish writer Julien Gracq, which is itself based on an obscure British legend of King Copethua (a misogynistic king who didn’t love women, until he saw a beggar and fell in love with her), which inspired this Pre-Raphaelite/symbolist painting:


    So, you can see that it all has roots in the art and literature of the late 19th century and early 20th century, but this is very much a free adaptation of those themes, made more by association of themes than by literal translation of a story into a movie. It truly is a modernist film that would feel perfectly modern among last year’s offerings at the Locarno film festival.

    Anyways, despite all those references, with its WWI setting and powerfully evocative aroma, I was also reminded of the worlds of Sándor Márai (in particular his novel Embers) and Stefan Zweig.

    But enough of references, you don’t need to know all of this to enjoy the film and chew its delicately encrypted musings. All of this is to say that all of you, but especially SOME of you, just need to watch this film.

    Maybe if I post images I’ll lure you more?















    WATCH IT!!!


    And I also wanted to talk about the magnificent A Touch of Zen (King Hu, 1971) but that post is already too long, I have to do some work, and anyways each of these two movies deserves to have the spotlight for their own for a while, so better to leave Appintment in Bray alone by now.
    un soir, un train is heartbreaking
    Quote Originally Posted by Goodfella View Post
    Jlaw stans will say red sparrow
    Quote Originally Posted by tyjagi View Post
    attack Jennifer Lawrence again

  6. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goodfella View Post
    un soir, un train is heartbreaking
    Yes! It's even better than Appointment at Bray.


  7. #167
    Senior Member Goodfella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    Yes! It's even better than Appointment at Bray.
    It's the only one I have seen yet. I put this on my watchlist though, do you have any other suggestions?

    You said one thing that makes perfect sense with un soir, un train. You know the big final "twist"? That applies perfectly to the sentence "this is a director that CAN". Very difficult to portray without being ridicolous but he pulled it off perfectly. And he also manages to put some wonderful dreamy scenario before it. A rewatch must be very close!
    I also did not know he was from Belgium! A country that is a total blindspot to me, aside from the dardennes maybe, and mr. nobody
    Quote Originally Posted by Goodfella View Post
    Jlaw stans will say red sparrow
    Quote Originally Posted by tyjagi View Post
    attack Jennifer Lawrence again

  8. #168
    Orphan, Fool JeanRZEJ's Avatar
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    Belgium makes the most depressing films. Austria makes miserablist films with a straight face, whereas Belgium makes miserablist films while pushing your face into the mud. Bullhead was supposed to be a light comedy. Broken Circle Breakdown is a romantic comedy. It gets darker from there. Great country (in the smallest doses)!
    “Truth, like light, blinds. Falsehood, on the contrary, is a beautiful twilight that enhances every object.”

  9. #169
    Senior Member Goodfella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeanRZEJ View Post
    Belgium makes the most depressing films. Austria makes miserablist films with a straight face, whereas Belgium makes miserablist films while pushing your face into the mud. Bullhead was supposed to be a light comedy. Broken Circle Breakdown is a romantic comedy. It gets darker from there. Great country (in the smallest doses)!
    It's an interest perspective. What about the dutch Sporloos?
    Quote Originally Posted by Goodfella View Post
    Jlaw stans will say red sparrow
    Quote Originally Posted by tyjagi View Post
    attack Jennifer Lawrence again

  10. #170
    Orphan, Fool JeanRZEJ's Avatar
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    I think I've only seen one purely Dutch film. I only really know two Dutch filmmakers off the top of my head, and I've seen one film between them!
    “Truth, like light, blinds. Falsehood, on the contrary, is a beautiful twilight that enhances every object.”

  11. #171
    Senior Member average joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    Appointment in Bray (Delvaux, 1971)

    Ok, guys, who do I have to fuck, what do I have to do, so to make AW start watching Delvaux’s films, and start talking about him?
    You can start by letting me know how I can watch his films in the US.
    I just found "The Man Who Had His Hair Cut Short" on YouTube, so I'll try to watch that.

  12. #172
    Noli Me Tangere lazarus's Avatar
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    Coincidentally, I watched A Touch of Zen myself recently, but hadn't written about it. While it's obviously a major influence on Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, I felt that Ang Lee's film bested King Hu's in almost every conceivable way, perhaps excepting the historical political commentary. Curious to hear your thoughts, McT, because there's definitely discussion to be had on what is still a very impressive work.
    RIVETTE, TOUJOURS

  13. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by average joe View Post
    You can start by letting me know how I can watch his films in the US.
    I just found "The Man Who Had His Hair Cut Short" on YouTube, so I'll try to watch that.
    Ask Netflix!

    I haven't seen The Man who Had... And it's supposedly his best! I'm holding it off somewhat on purpose.

    You can probably order Bray in Amazon, if you have region free DVD player. If not, there are some, ahem, means...


  14. #174
    Senior Member average joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    Ask Netflix!

    If only!

    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    You can probably order Bray in Amazon, if you have region free DVD player. If not, there are some, ahem, means...
    Yeah, I should finally look into "other means"

  15. #175
    Noli Me Tangere lazarus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    Appointment in Bray (Delvaux, 1971)

    Ok, guys, who do I have to fuck, what do I have to do, so to make AW start watching Delvaux’s films, and start talking about him? This film in particular would be such an AW darling if AW watched it. Dreamy, ambiguous, elusive. People like filmy or Lost in the Warmest Color should worship it.

    I’m usually suspicious when people say things, about films, like “it’s better to not try to understand it, just go with it” or “just let yourself go” or “abandon yourself to it”, not because it’s not a nice thing to do and a nice approach to certain films, but because I feel it’s often abused, and used for films that don’t merit it, as an excuse for films in which the filmmakers presented things in convoluted ways, or didn’t even know very well what they wanted to say, or were vague, or things like that. Of course, there are masters who can make films that are engaging even when you don’t understand what’s going on, or when you don’t have traditional narrative consistence or thematic clarity, but certainly not everybody can do it, yet the internet often acts as if anybody with a vague and messy film was just some genius and you are not getting it because you didn’t abandon yourself to the mess.

    Well, Delvaux is one of those who CAN make it.

    This is a film in which not much happens, and when the ending is approaching, and you know the film is getting to an end, you wonder “Ok, there’s only two minutes left and nothing of what I was possibly expecting has happened, and in fact not much has happened at all, and I’m not even sure I get the point of the little that has happened”, yet you’ve followed it mesmerized, intrigued, seduced, totally immersed in the mystery of its images and sounds (which are incredibly evocative and suggestive).

    After it ended I was left, I must acknowledge, a little more puzzled than surrendered, even though I had been surrendered to its imagery for 99% of its running time, but then it ends and I was left a bit… “That’s it?” However, that abrupt ending, with its lack of anything resembling narrative climax/denouement/solution, almost immediately made me feel (kind of realise) that had been part of the point all along. The movie started reconfiguring in my head and some of its themes started becoming clearer.

    Still, I didn’t have a very precise take on it, but reading Jonathan Rosenbaum’s review ( http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net/197...z-vous-a-bray/ ), who, by the way, considers it the best Belgian film ever, was very illuminating, and helped me form my own take on it.

    Not that it’s possible to determine a clear “meaning” here: this is willingly mysterious and subtly surreal, so part of the point is not totally getting it (and as I say this is no excuse, Delvaux is among the few who can make unresolved mystery and vagueness work without sacrificing depth and intellectual challenges); but still there are themes here, and very well developed, and some of them became clearer to me thanks to Rosenbaum’s review.

    As in the other Delvaux films I’ve seen, we have a passive protagonist, whose passiveness (although it’s more accurately neutrality in the case of Woman in a Twilight Garden) is one of the main subjects of both the action and the thematic exploration. Saying much more about what I think it’s about (among many things) would perhaps spoil a bit both the mystery of it all and a the little plot there is, so suffice to say that this is a beguiling poetic incursion in the blurry borders between being principled, being passive, being afraid, and what it all implies for your life and what you make of it.

    It’s nominally an adaptation of the novel King Copethua by surreal-ish writer Julien Gracq, which is itself based on an obscure British legend of King Copethua (a misogynistic king who didn’t love women, until he saw a beggar and fell in love with her), which inspired this Pre-Raphaelite/symbolist painting:


    So, you can see that it all has roots in the art and literature of the late 19th century and early 20th century, but this is very much a free adaptation of those themes, made more by association of themes than by literal translation of a story into a movie. It truly is a modernist film that would feel perfectly modern among last year’s offerings at the Locarno film festival.

    Anyways, despite all those references, with its WWI setting and powerfully evocative aroma, I was also reminded of the worlds of Sándor Márai (in particular his novel Embers) and Stefan Zweig.

    But enough of references, you don’t need to know all of this to enjoy the film and chew its delicately encrypted musings. All of this is to say that all of you, but especially SOME of you, just need to watch this film.

    Maybe if I post images I’ll lure you more?















    WATCH IT!!!
    You'll be pleased to know that I found a DVD on sale at Amazon (from a Belgian seller) for $20, and just blind-bought it. There is a torrent floating around (and normally if it's a more expensive import I'll go that route), but it's old and not a high-quality rip.

    I trust you and JoRo, plus Bulle Ogier, Anna Karina, and the mention of Fantomas was too good to pass up!
    RIVETTE, TOUJOURS

  16. #176
    Team Huppert MorganaleFey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTeague View Post
    Appointment in Bray (Delvaux, 1971)

    Ok, guys, who do I have to fuck, what do I have to do, so to make AW start watching Delvaux’s films, and start talking about him? This film in particular would be such an AW darling if AW watched it. Dreamy, ambiguous, elusive. People like filmy or Lost in the Warmest Color should worship it.

    I’m usually suspicious when people say things, about films, like “it’s better to not try to understand it, just go with it” or “just let yourself go” or “abandon yourself to it”, not because it’s not a nice thing to do and a nice approach to certain films, but because I feel it’s often abused, and used for films that don’t merit it, as an excuse for films in which the filmmakers presented things in convoluted ways, or didn’t even know very well what they wanted to say, or were vague, or things like that. Of course, there are masters who can make films that are engaging even when you don’t understand what’s going on, or when you don’t have traditional narrative consistence or thematic clarity, but certainly not everybody can do it, yet the internet often acts as if anybody with a vague and messy film was just some genius and you are not getting it because you didn’t abandon yourself to the mess.

    Well, Delvaux is one of those who CAN make it.

    This is a film in which not much happens, and when the ending is approaching, and you know the film is getting to an end, you wonder “Ok, there’s only two minutes left and nothing of what I was possibly expecting has happened, and in fact not much has happened at all, and I’m not even sure I get the point of the little that has happened”, yet you’ve followed it mesmerized, intrigued, seduced, totally immersed in the mystery of its images and sounds (which are incredibly evocative and suggestive).

    After it ended I was left, I must acknowledge, a little more puzzled than surrendered, even though I had been surrendered to its imagery for 99% of its running time, but then it ends and I was left a bit… “That’s it?” However, that abrupt ending, with its lack of anything resembling narrative climax/denouement/solution, almost immediately made me feel (kind of realise) that had been part of the point all along. The movie started reconfiguring in my head and some of its themes started becoming clearer.

    Still, I didn’t have a very precise take on it, but reading Jonathan Rosenbaum’s review ( http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net/197...z-vous-a-bray/ ), who, by the way, considers it the best Belgian film ever, was very illuminating, and helped me form my own take on it.

    Not that it’s possible to determine a clear “meaning” here: this is willingly mysterious and subtly surreal, so part of the point is not totally getting it (and as I say this is no excuse, Delvaux is among the few who can make unresolved mystery and vagueness work without sacrificing depth and intellectual challenges); but still there are themes here, and very well developed, and some of them became clearer to me thanks to Rosenbaum’s review.

    As in the other Delvaux films I’ve seen, we have a passive protagonist, whose passiveness (although it’s more accurately neutrality in the case of Woman in a Twilight Garden) is one of the main subjects of both the action and the thematic exploration. Saying much more about what I think it’s about (among many things) would perhaps spoil a bit both the mystery of it all and a the little plot there is, so suffice to say that this is a beguiling poetic incursion in the blurry borders between being principled, being passive, being afraid, and what it all implies for your life and what you make of it.

    It’s nominally an adaptation of the novel King Copethua by surreal-ish writer Julien Gracq, which is itself based on an obscure British legend of King Copethua (a misogynistic king who didn’t love women, until he saw a beggar and fell in love with her), which inspired this Pre-Raphaelite/symbolist painting:


    So, you can see that it all has roots in the art and literature of the late 19th century and early 20th century, but this is very much a free adaptation of those themes, made more by association of themes than by literal translation of a story into a movie. It truly is a modernist film that would feel perfectly modern among last year’s offerings at the Locarno film festival.

    Anyways, despite all those references, with its WWI setting and powerfully evocative aroma, I was also reminded of the worlds of Sándor Márai (in particular his novel Embers) and Stefan Zweig.

    But enough of references, you don’t need to know all of this to enjoy the film and chew its delicately encrypted musings. All of this is to say that all of you, but especially SOME of you, just need to watch this film.

    Maybe if I post images I’ll lure you more?















    WATCH IT!!!


    And I also wanted to talk about the magnificent A Touch of Zen (King Hu, 1971) but that post is already too long, I have to do some work, and anyways each of these two movies deserves to have the spotlight for their own for a while, so better to leave Appintment in Bray alone by now.
    You will be pleased to know I'm watching the collaboration with Legend Barrault today

  17. #177
    Sara Allorn calls me “Portugal. The Man”
    Join Date: Aug 2015
    Location: Portugal
    Posts: 10,062
    How do I tell my pseudo-boyfriend that I'm not a huge fan of westerns and I'm not interested in watching Rio Bravo?

  18. #178
    I'm into leather. Alvy Singer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardys View Post
    How do I tell my pseudo-boyfriend that I'm not a huge fan of westerns and I'm not interested in watching Rio Bravo?
    But Rio Bravo is amazing.

  19. #179
    Team Huppert MorganaleFey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardys View Post
    How do I tell my pseudo-boyfriend that I'm not a huge fan of westerns and I'm not interested in watching Rio Bravo?
    That's a reason for breaking up! Westerns are the best genre evah

  20. #180
    Sara Allorn calls me “Portugal. The Man”
    Join Date: Aug 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alvy Singer View Post
    But Rio Bravo is amazing.
    Quote Originally Posted by MorganaleFey View Post
    That's a reason for breaking up! Westerns are the best genre evah
    We're doing a double session tonight. He chose Rio Bravo and I chose Kore-eda's After Life

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