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Thread: Official 66th Cannes Film Festival: Vagina is the Only Color

  1. #881
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    Quote Originally Posted by aurélie View Post
    Adele Exarchopoulos interview
    http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/...cle1267567.ece
    "She says Steven Spielberg, president of the Cannes jury this year, told her after the ceremony that “he would show the film to his children, that it was the most beautiful love story he had ever seen”. She adds: “We had been worried that the man behind ET would say, ‘Wow, it’s a lot too sexual for me’, but he adored it.”"
    Still laughing at those two hours were AD (now AW) exploded in hatred of Spielberg and a handful of us tried to hold it back until it was official...

  2. #882
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    Quote Originally Posted by moviewatcher View Post
    Still laughing at those two hours were AD (now AW) exploded in hatred of Spielberg and a handful of us tried to hold it back until it was official...
    Not my proudest moment that is for sure. Really should have taken a valium when I first saw those leaks.

    That said, I love that Spielberg (and the whole jury) has repeatedly emphasized "love story". Not "lesbian love story" but "love story". And that is quite a compliment by him.

  3. #883
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldw View Post
    Not my proudest moment that is for sure. Really should have taken a valium when I first saw those leaks.

    That said, I love that Spielberg (and the whole jury) has repeatedly emphasized "love story". Not "lesbian love story" but "love story". And that is quite a compliment by him.
    But I remember you did show a lot of dignity and grace later when you wrote that apology.

    And I like that emphasis on "love story" too.

  4. #884
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    Quote Originally Posted by moviewatcher View Post
    But I remember you did show a lot of dignity and grace later when you wrote that apology.

    And I like that emphasis on "love story" too.
    The original title of the vile NY Times Article was "Darling Of Cannes Turns Slutty Impostor". It was changed of course but that it ever happened is astonishing.
    Last edited by ldw; 06-09-2013 at 12:45 PM.

  5. #885
    Storyteller ladylurks's Avatar
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    It's interesting to note that Spielberg took a lot of heat for the lesbian love/sex scene in The Color Purple - very mild by today's standards, but still shocking to mainstream viewers in the mid 80s. Some felt that was one of the reasons TCP didn't win any Oscars, after being nominated across the board.

  6. #886
    My religion is hedonism Aurelius's Avatar
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    I've made a reservation for the graphic novel at my local library, as I plan to do a comparison piece on the adaptation from novel to film and the resulting controversy for ICS .
    I will marshall all the forces of darkness to hound you to an assisted suicide - Peter Capaldi, In The Loop

  7. #887
    مشکلیں اتنی پڑیں کہ آسان ہو گیں haqyunus's Avatar
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    So a lengthy discussion in NYTimes about what constitutes a good sex scene brought on by the controversy related to Blue is the Warmest Color and Manohla Dargis' subsequent review. Armond White also chimes in
    http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate...-the-movies?hp


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  8. #888
    My religion is hedonism Aurelius's Avatar
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    LOL, only two out of the six people discussing this have seen the film, and only one of them managed to place the scenes (Jordan Mintzer, when he says "Yet the beauty and verisimilitude of “Blue’s” sex scenes would be worthless without their meaning within the greater context of the story". What he says next is reaching, by the way).

    People have to understand that these are not love scenes, but lust scenes. The two are lovers, but they are not in love yet, not the kind of love a relationship, given time, grows into.
    I will marshall all the forces of darkness to hound you to an assisted suicide - Peter Capaldi, In The Loop

  9. #889
    Senior Member danielvin's Avatar
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    I'm going to see La Vie d'Adele in two weeks! Can't wait to see what all the talk is about!

  10. #890
    Amorously Venemous erikdean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielvin View Post
    I'm going to see La Vie d'Adele in two weeks! Can't wait to see what all the talk is about!
    Attention basics; your Queen has arrived, you can go now.




  11. #891
    Senior Member danielvin's Avatar
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    From what I've read they have already cut out some graphic shots. I hope it's not true. We will see.

  12. #892
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aurelius View Post
    LOL, only two out of the six people discussing this have seen the film, and only one of them managed to place the scenes (Jordan Mintzer, when he says "Yet the beauty and verisimilitude of “Blue’s” sex scenes would be worthless without their meaning within the greater context of the story". What he says next is reaching, by the way).

    People have to understand that these are not love scenes, but lust scenes. The two are lovers, but they are not in love yet, not the kind of love a relationship, given time, grows into.
    Well now that lesbian viewers are posting their thoughts upon seeing the film (it appears that it is showing in certain places in Europe such as Italy), there seem to be three points coming up.

    1. The film removes the worst aspects of the book*. The film feels real.

    2. What stays with the viewers is not the sex scenes but three heartbreaking sequences Emma kicking Adele out, a sequence in a bar afterward, and an art gallery sequence at the end .

    3. How Adele being closeted to some people in her life is an issue but it is handled as a subtle instead of heavyhanded manner.

    As far as the sex scenes, no one seems to have a problem with them. It is seen as critical to the story and well done. Which is what I expected considering Kechiche.

    Thought this was pretty dead on (well I certainly don't revere Dargis** but the rest).

    Ah, but what was that sensibility? Much of the criticism centred upon the proposition that, as a heterosexual male, Kechiche had no ‘right’ to tell this particular story—and furthermore, that his treatment was inevitably deformed by his own prurient interests. “The film,” said the New York Times’ Manohla Dargis (a critic I revere, and a friend), “feels more about Mr. Kechiche’s desires than anything else.”

    Really? Apart from the obvious qualification—to see the film as only being ‘about’ sexuality, is to overlook both its perceptive analysis of class, and its forensic dissection of relationship-dynamics—I’d point out that there are, and should be, no rules governing what one can and cannot write about. Anyone can tell any story they please: the question, ultimately, is how well, or not, they do it. It’s an aesthetic judgment, not a moral truth. And to suggest otherwise is to swallow the kind of bullshit exclusionism that (to take one local example) saw David Marr once claim that only homosexual men could really understand the novels of Patrick White.

    I’m extremely intolerant of this kind of FUBU group-think—which not only tries to limit the work under scrutiny to some pious notion of the Ideal Reader, but also confines said works to a kind of rarefied ghetto, a smug little island of Us, solely writing for and talking to others like Us. Art—real art—is bigger than that, by definition.
    http://www.sbs.com.au/films/movie/15...warmest-colour

    *The book apparently features several tropes that do not exist in the movie - one of the two women dies, the two women engage in sex that consists solely of oral sex and fingering, the struggle with the parents and the parents rejection of their daughter's lover.
    **That said I have not lost complete respect for her as I have with Taubin after her "ridiculously, flawlessly beautiful" comment.
    Last edited by ldw; 06-18-2013 at 12:45 AM.

  13. #893
    Show her the tampon straw! DirkDiggler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielvin View Post


    From what I've read they have already cut out some graphic shots. I hope it's not true. We will see.
    Where did you hear this? link?

  14. #894
    My religion is hedonism Aurelius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDiggler View Post
    Where did you hear this? link?
    Why are you so preoccupied with this?
    I will marshall all the forces of darkness to hound you to an assisted suicide - Peter Capaldi, In The Loop

  15. #895
    Senior Member danielvin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDiggler View Post
    Where did you hear this?
    A few italians that have seen the movie a few days ago in Rome.

  16. #896
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielvin View Post
    A few italians that have seen the movie a few days ago in Rome.
    We have several posts coming in at other forums from those who have seen it. I have allowed myself to get way too spoiled. As far as the sex scenes, if there were cuts it certainly doesn't sound like much. Comments from the lesbian posters who saw the film on the one site I visit have said that the first sex scene between the women is lengthy and real and raw and only someone with a preset agenda would see something wrong with them. And very much needed. But that is not the focus of the posters. The focus is other sequences - a kiss in a park before the first sex scene for example has gotten more focus than the sex scenes. There are several pages upon pages discussing the last 30 minutes or so. There are only few posts talking about the sex which is judged as realistic and passionate (and critical) but not the parts which will overwhelm the viewer. In fact, when sex is brought up, the general reactions by these lesbian posters are close to Aurelius and Erik Dean. They say that there is so much more than just sex with an almost exasperated tone.

    *One of the interesting things is they see Adele as a realistic portrayal of a typical semi-closeted lesbian. Heavy focus that she is not out at work which is red flag territory (some would say run the other way territory). That said there seems to be far more empathy for Adele from the posters and seems to be things the lesbian posters are discussing that I haven't seen focused on in reviews.
    Last edited by ldw; 06-18-2013 at 04:23 PM.

  17. #897
    My religion is hedonism Aurelius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldw View Post
    *One of the interesting things is they see Adele as a realistic portrayal of a typical semi-closeted lesbian. Heavy focus that she is not out at work which is red flag territory (some would say run the other way territory). That said there seems to be far more empathy for Adele from the posters and seems to be things the lesbian posters are discussing that I haven't seen focused on in reviews.
    I think that, in the end, Adèle is still confused about how to deal with the fact that she's a lesbian. I think that by the end of the film, she still hasn't fully accepted it. Not that she doesn't want to be, but it's something that turns her whole life upside down, and I can imagine it takes some time to process that.
    I will marshall all the forces of darkness to hound you to an assisted suicide - Peter Capaldi, In The Loop

  18. #898
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aurelius View Post
    I think that, in the end, Adèle is still confused about how to deal with the fact that she's a lesbian. I think that by the end of the film, she still hasn't fully accepted it. Not that she doesn't want to be, but it's something that turns her whole life upside down, and I can imagine it takes some time to process that.
    IIRC, I think that the film even considers the possibility that Adèle may not even be a lesbian. Besides being a realistic portrayal of the rise and fall of a relationship, I thought the film worked well toward the idea - which I like very much - that Adèle is in love with Emma primarily because of what she represents culturally. She sees a girl with blue hair, arm around another girl in public without shame, and she's instantly head over heals. Emma's into art, is a painter, and works toward a life that is opposed to the bourgeois idea of 'making a living'. Adèle clearly holds an allergy to 'the system', attending protests and what not, and the film's implication that she's not a full-blown lesbian, but actually questioning and confused (once she and Emma meet after they have broken up, and Adèle admits that she has experimented with other girls and guys, but has been unable to match the intensity of what she felt for Emma) , and maybe even straight, is actually one of the things that made her relationship and desire for Emma all the more fascinating for me.

  19. #899
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Giancarlo View Post
    IIRC, I think that the film even considers the possibility that Adèle may not even be a lesbian. Besides being a realistic portrayal of the rise and fall of a relationship, I thought the film worked well toward the idea - which I like very much - that Adèle is in love with Emma primarily because of what she represents culturally. She sees a girl with blue hair, arm around another girl in public without shame, and she's instantly head over heals. Emma's into art, is a painter, and works toward a life that is opposed to the bourgeois idea of 'making a living'. Adèle clearly holds an allergy to 'the system', attending protests and what not, and the film's implication that she's not a full-blown lesbian, but actually questioning and confused (once she and Emma meet after they have broken up, and Adèle admits that she has experimented with other girls and guys, but has been unable to match the intensity of what she felt for Emma) , and maybe even straight, is actually one of the things that made her relationship and desire for Emma all the more fascinating for me.
    Furthermore, after reflecting on the film a bit more since I made this post, I think I might be prone to think this way because of the filter of my own experience. Emma and Adèle's relationship reminds me a lot of two girls that I worked with: once they began to date, everyone assumed that it was all a big facade, because they had previously only dated guys, and were both inhumanly pretty "lipstick" girls. They had a troubled, jealous, but passionate relationship that lasted for two years, and once they broke up, one of them concluded that she actually is more attracted to girls than guys, and has continued to date other girls. Meanwhile the other is heartbroken, still in love with her ex, but thinks that once she dates another person, it will probably be a guy, and everyone around her uses this to justify their initial reaction that they never believed she was a lesbian to begin with. Blue is the Warmest Color also reminds me of relationships that I have had, too: one example of how it does this for me takes me back to a scene where after Adèle throws a party on Emma's behalf, and they get into bed afterwards. In bed, Emma tells Adèle that she isn't doing anything with enough gravitas in her life, and criticizes her for not living up to a high-brow sense of her "potential". Emma wants her to write more, and Adèle argues that she journals extensively, but does it for herself. Adèle doesn't feel that she needs to impress anyone, and tells Emma that she feels fulfilled by her teaching job, by entertaining for their friends, etc. It is really obvious that Emma wants Adèle to be a stellar writer for her own benefit, and not Adèle's, and it looks like she is trying to convince Adèle to be dissatisfied with her life because she is so insecure about her own artistic merit. And, seeing how pretentious Emma's friends are shows that she probably thinks that she'll be judged by her friends for not having a partner "worthy" of her. Seeing all this was like being smacked with a 2x4: my most recent ex-boyfriend is an up-and-coming, already acclaimed director of Shakespearean theatre in Canadian theatre circles, and one of the biggest struggles we had in our relationship is that he is so passionate about what he does, and is doing it, so he couldn't relate to me feeling happy working a low-rent job. He tried to force me to find a way to find employment in some facet of the arts, and could not understand that what I am doing is so perfect for what I want, right now. So, seeing that scene was like staring into a mirror.

    I imagine a big reason why this film is so universally loved is because it is ambiguous and anything but dogmatic in its exploration of the two girls' sexuality, but is so packed full of substance, and there is so much that make this a relatable and emotional experience for people of any demographic. Oh, Lord, I'm getting even more emotional about this film!

  20. #900
    My religion is hedonism Aurelius's Avatar
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    I love that last post, especially the spoilered part. Excellent analysis. The ambiguity is indeed the film's strong suit, or perhaps it's more the 'who cares that they are two women' attitude. I strongly believe that Adèle is deeply in love with Emma, even after their breakup , but the film doesn't emphasize the 'OMG Lesbians!' aspect when they are together at all. That is why the controversy over the sex scenes is so stupid. These are two people in love, and they happen to be two women. And they have sex. Big deal. Is Adèle a lesbian? Is she bisexual? Does it really matter for their relationship? I don't think it does. The handling of the relationship would have been just as strong if they were a heterosexual couple, because that doesn't make a difference when it comes to how people interact in a relationship. The only thing exclusively 'lesbian' is the social stigma's put upon them by some of the other characters (exclusively 'same sex relationship' is better, probably). Not the sex, that's basically two people lusting for each other, nothing sexual orientation specific about that.
    I will marshall all the forces of darkness to hound you to an assisted suicide - Peter Capaldi, In The Loop

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